Friday, 11 August 2017

Otter


Otters are one of my favourite mammals and are fairly common around Shetland. Once you get your eye in they are reasonably easy to spot.


Shetland has one of the highest density of otters in Europe with around 1500 around the coastline.



Surprisingly the best and easiest place to see them is at the inter island ferry terminals. They don't seem to both about people being as close as 20 feet away providing you don't move suddenly or make a loud noise.


I remember a few years ago while waiting for the ferry, i had just got out of the car when two Otters ran down the pier towards us passing three cars, they stopped about 6 feet away before disappearing over the edge and back in the sea.





The best time to look is two hours either side of high tide when they like to find food, often i have seen them at a distance diving before they eventually swim to shore.










Just another reason to come to Shetland

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Wednesday, 2 August 2017

Seabird

A few seabirds in  the south mainland , Fulmars seem to be doing ok, but although some Puffins have been bring in sandeels there has been alot of birds just loafing around which is not a good sign of breeding







                                                                                                 Razorbill


Gannet numbers have increased along with Storm Petrels.  Over the years  the Mousa Petrels have increased from 8000 to 15000 birds which is superb.







Not many migrants around with a few Crossbill, Willow warblers and Grey Heron


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Friday, 28 July 2017

Hoddie & others


Hoddie Crows have a bad name in Shetland often stealing eggs in a well organised raid. 

Out of 8 young this is the only mallard young to survive this year in one area of the south mainland with locals saying the Hoddie Crows and herring Gulls are to blame

In the same area only one Ringed Plover chick survived




Shetland doesn't have a large number of corvid Species  with only Rook & Hoddie breeding.
On migration the odd Carrion Crow and Jackdaw may appear but only in small flocks


This young Hoddie was not nervous at all and just sat on a wall with the parent bird watching from a distance.






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